Selecting BB Red breeders - Page 2 - OEGB Int'l Society

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Selecting BB Red breeders

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  • On line crosses it takes 3 generations to see any progress. That 3rd year is the make it or breakit year. You will either say OK this is worth continuing or you will throw your hands in the air and say what's the use. Feed is high, it is taking up my time and space and it is just not worth it. The less patient man will get rid of them and move on to something else.
  • I single mated from a pair once, bred back to the same female two years in a row with her best cockerel each time, and upon the third year all sorts of crap popped up and I had that same feeling you're talking about, only I was alot younger and took a fool's advice and started from scratch with new fowl, if I knew then what I know now how much better those birds would have been! That's what I call learning the hard way! How true Kjundog, must have hit that stump yourself huh? No fun!
  • I have had my setbacks but can't take the credit for the third generation thing. It is in a book by an old friend the late great Plymouth Rock breeder Ralph Sturgeon. The book is called "Starting Where You Are With What You Have" and is a great source of knowledge on making a line. Since getting back in I have yet to find it to recreate the library I once had.
  • I have heard mention made of that book before, wouldn't mind having a copy myself. I tend to just single mate with one pair and then decide whether to breed back to the male or female side! Some male line can be actually bred from an outstanding female[not a show colored female] but outstanding in the other aspects! Of course the days of running the bator and those large hatches is pretty much on hold for me and not sure if I will do it again, time doesn't allow me to do it these days! Anyhow I still enjoy those small hatches from the little gals in the brood pen!
  • Hey Fowlplay are you an old large game cocker. I know they use the term single mate for mating a pair. In the exhibition poultry world single mate usually means one mating to produce show specimans of both sexes and double mate means a separate mating for the sexes. Pair mate means one on one, trio mate means 1 male 2 females, quad mate 1 male 3 females and any more I usually consider a flock mating which is a bunch of birds with one or more males running with them. Not trying to be smart, just trying to get us on the same page with terminology so we understand each other better when discussing. However I do know old habits are hard to break. Got a few myself.
  • The first year I crossed Barnes and Proctor I raised 27 birds and culled 23 of them. All had white feathers in the wings. I bred back to Barnes the second time and still culled the vast majority of them. The third breeding back to Barnes produced some great cockerels for me and I still have that line bred mating this year.
  • adminadmin Durant, OK
    Hey Fowlplay are you an old large game cocker. I know they use the term single mate for mating a pair. In the exhibition poultry world single mate usually means one mating to produce show specimans of both sexes and double mate means a separate mating for the sexes. Pair mate means one on one, trio mate means 1 male 2 females, quad mate 1 male 3 females and any more I usually consider a flock mating which is a bunch of birds with one or more males running with them. Not trying to be smart, just trying to get us on the same page with terminology so we understand each other better when discussing. However I do know old habits are hard to break. Got a few myself.
    Wayne, you are keeping me jumping. Excellent idea on terminology.

    Keep the ideas coming!
  • Sorry about that Kjundog, should have said it correctly, and yes I use to love to see them hatch fowl shuffle till i heard a rattle,LOL, but we are on the same page cause I should have said pair mate, and it's o.k. with me that you questioned me about that, feel free to clarify anything, anytime, actually you're better than spellcheck!!LOL
  • Should be able to further this discussion sometime this weekend. Hopefully get some side by side photos of male and femaleline breeders to show differences. Working a 16 hour shift tonight and got a few bushels of crabs to boil tommorrow since it is Good Friday. That's a big seafood day for a cajun. Will make an effort to get the male line female part wrapped up and start discussing the female line male. That is not nearly as complicated and should be quick.
  • You are doing a great service kdog! You are appreciated!
    Barry
  • cockofthewalkcockofthewalk Mead, Oklahoma
    I agree Kjundog, this has been some good reading. Hopefully it will help others and answer some questions.
  • Having fun doing this. If it makes the road a little smoother for one person then it is well worth the effort. You will never see my name in the record books as a master breeder or showman cuz I don't have the desire to show that much. Trying to raise a few good ones and sharing them with others is much more fullfilling. Let them win with my stock. I would love to say someone beat me with a bird I sold them. That say's so much more about the kind of person I am.
  • An ozee bbred
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  • Sorry to learn how to post photos
  • I agree kjundog, the top of the food chain is for some and others will just be happy with the crumbs off the table, I have never felt the need for the top spot but would rather be useful for the purpose of furthering the breed. Iwould like to see everybody have superior fowl, makes the playing field more level, No big I's and little U's, get my drift!!!
  • I raise show birds because it a great hobby that keeps me outside all day and off the sofa. Attending shows is a great pleasure because I get to see so many great birds and talk to all my friends in the hobby.
  • Barry I couldn't have said it better myself!! Wayne, even though we've never meet you are a fine individual, and I greatly appreciate the knowledge that you share with all of us. This is a very good topic and I've enjoyed reading it!!! Keep it up!!
  • Thanks guys. What I post is simply the way I do it and certainly not all will agree on everything. Standard leaves alot of room for personnal interprtation. A good example of this is the descrition in the tail for color. Top two feathers stippled. Do them mean the top two on each side or the top one on each side? That is up to the individual to interpret since the ones who wrote it are not here to clarify that. Should get over to Aaron's today where the females line is being bred so getting some more photos and continuing this further is about to resume.
  • OK, finally am rested and ready after a 15 hr. night shift and a full day of festivities yesterday. Enough of patting on the back of and that aboys. Let's get back to the educational part. In the next posts I will wrap up the male line females with a few words and photos. The two in this post is a side by side profile of a male line and a female line breeder bird. If you can see in the photo, the black spiral band bird is the Tanner female line. At first glance not much difference seen. But the next couple posts will show some details as best I can because my camera sucks when it is real close up.

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    Comparison 2.JPG
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  • Please excuse their condition. They are not in the best of feather as they have been in the breed pen since January. In this post compare the shafting and the stippling. The bird on the right is male line and the bird on the left is female line. Notice both are stippled but the female line is finely stippled and is more brown while the male line stippling is coarser ans shows more black. Shafting on male line is more predominant although there is a little on the female line bird.
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    Male Shafting and stippling.JPG
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